Archive for the Athletic Shoes Category

The Shoe Expert Blog: a TOMS Shoes Books for Bloggers Winner!

Posted in Athletic Shoes, Health & Wellness, Shoes with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 10, 2011 by The Shoe Expert

Hi shoe lovers, fans, and readers of my shoe blog! Thank you to all of you for supporting this blog and helping me become one of the winners of the TOMS Shoes Free Books for Bloggers! As a winner of one of Blake Mycoskie’s new book “Start Something That Matters” I will be posting a review of the book and will be holding a contest on this blog for one of our readers to also win a free copy of his book…so stay tuned for details in the next week! 🙂

I just want to add that although I have not read the book yet, Blake continues to inspire me with his efforts in the shoe donations that he has given to children in need as Chief Shoe Giver at TOMS Shoes. Thanks for the inspiration, Blake!

Dedicated to your foot health and to your shoes,

Dr. Michele, The Shoe Expert

“All Shoes, All the Time!”

Advertisements

Reebok & The 25 Million Dollar ‘Toning’ Shoes

Posted in Athletic Shoes, Exercising, Fashion, Physical Fitness, Shoes with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 1, 2011 by The Shoe Expert

Reebok EASY TONE(2009)

Image via Wikipedia

As you may or may not have heard, this week the Federal Trade Commission has ruled that Reebok has to reimburse its customers $25 million for deceptive advertising for EasyTone and RunTone shoes, according to MSNBC.com. I just have to add that I have been telling my patients, friends, and readers this for months: if you want a ‘toned’ butt or legs, you have to actually exercise. A pair of shoes cannot do the work for you! Countless patients have come into my office with these shoes (as well as Skechers Shape-Ups and other toning shoes), asking me what I think of them. Well, there you go. That’s what I think of them.

The Federal Trade Commission states that Reebok could not support specific claims made in ads that wearing EasyTone shoes resulted in “28 percent more strength and tone in the buttock muscles, 11 percent more strength and tone in the hamstring muscles, and 11 percent more strength and tone in the calf muscles than regular walking shoes.”

The settlement bars Reebok from making claims that its shoes are effective in toning or strengthening without supporting scientific evidence. Reebok has discontinued ads that contain the claims and has asked stores to remove offending signs and displays.

If you want a refund for EasyTone shoes, just fill out the application at http://reeboksettlement.com/FTC. You will get the refunds either directly from the Federal Trade Commission or through a court-approved, class action lawsuit. The amount of refunds will be determined by a federal judge.

Dedicated to your foot health and to your shoes,

Dr. Michele, The Shoe Expert

“All Shoes, All the Time!”

The Shoe Expert in USA Today!

Posted in Athletic Shoes, Fashion, Shoes with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 1, 2011 by The Shoe Expert

Once again I have to say a big THANK YOU to all of my fans, friends, and readers who have consistently logged in to see what I have to say about shoes, especially women’s shoes! So thank you, thank you , thank you! Because of all of this activity, my blog was picked up by USA Today who interviewed me a few weeks ago to discuss shoes of course. The online version of the article was published yesterday, but the printed version will be available next week.

Some of the shoe types that we discuss in the article are Flip Flops, UGGs (or boots like the classic UGGs),Foldable Ballet Flats, Platform Pumps, Stilettos, Minimalist Shoes (such as the Vibram Five Fingers and the yoga toe shoes), and the dreaded Rocker Bottom Athletic Shoes (yes, we all know about these fashion-don’ts, don’t we, ladies?).

I’m sure if you’ve been one of my readers during this past year, you know that I’ve discussed each one of these shoes at least once. Sometimes on this blog we talk fashion, function, or both, but one thing that we always do is talk shoes!

So thanks again!

One last thank you for helping this blog reach its goal of 60,000 views in one year, which by the way was last week! 🙂

For more foot info, you can always view my website or my podiatry blog. But for shoe info, don’t go anywhere! More is to be revealed…

Dedicated to your foot health and to your shoes,

Dr. Michele, The Shoe Expert

“All Shoes, All the Time!”

Not All Skechers Are Created Equal

Posted in Athletic Shoes, Health & Wellness, Shoes with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 6, 2011 by The Shoe Expert

Hey shoe lovers! I took a little break from blogging last month to work on some new, big things coming your way soon! Of course, it’s all about shoes…

So now back to the blogging…

I took my daughter to Skechers today to get her some boots for school (which starts later this month–by the way, if  you have kids, have you read my blog post about back-to-school shoe shopping?)…and I noticed a fairly new addition to the Skechers line of toning shoes. Most people know about their famous Shape-Ups, but they have several types of toning shoes now. The ones that caught my eye looked the most “normal” of all of them: the Tone-Ups Fitness.

Now don’t get them confused with the Tone-Ups.

Although they look very similar, that is where the similarities ended for me. The two styles feel very different when you walk in them. As a test, I put one of each on my feet and walked up and down the aisles to get a good feel for them. The Tone-Ups felt very stiff and uncomfortable in both the upper of the shoe and in the footbed lining. But the most uncomfortable part about them was during heel strike. As I took each step and my heel hit the floor, the sole of the shoe felt like I was walking on a hard bump. Not a good feeling. On the other hand, when I walked in the Tone-Ups Fitness, I have to admit that the shoes felt good. The sole felt a little spongier and cushy than my running shoes and other athletic shoes, but it was not uncomfortable. It kinda felt good. Weird that such similar shoes felt so different. I even asked the salesperson before I did my little ‘experiment’ and he said that the main difference between them was that the new shoes (the Tone-Ups Fitness) were more lightweight than the older versions. Sorry, Skechers salesperson, you were super nice and helpful climbing up the ladder to get me my size 🙂 but that is not the main difference between them.

Moral of the story: Don’t count on the sales associate to give you the low down on the shoes you are going to put your feet in! Try them out for yourself and save yourself some discomfort when you get them home!

Dedicated to your foot health and to your shoes,

Dr. Michele, The Shoe Expert

“All Shoes, All the Time!”

Shoes…From a Kid’s Perspective

Posted in Athletic Shoes, Shoes with tags , , , , on April 18, 2011 by The Shoe Expert

“Shoes”

by a Guest Blogger, my daughter Summer

I took a poll at school today, and the girls in my class (fourth grade) said that the shoes they would like to see in a shoe store are mostly knee high Converse, Vans, and Uggs.

Knee High Converse Chuck Taylor

(Available at Nordstrom)

Vans Original Style “Shot2Heart”

 (Available online)

 

UGG Kids Boots

(Available at Zappos)

Not bad for a first time 9 year old blogger! 🙂
 
Related Articles:

Dr. Oz Suggests “How to Find the Best Shoe for You”

Posted in Athletic Shoes, Health & Wellness, Shoes with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 11, 2011 by The Shoe Expert

Footprint with Flat feet

Image via Wikipedia

Have any of you seen Dr. Oz’s segment titled “How to Find the Best Shoe for You” ? He does a great job of explaining differences in foot types: high arch, normal foot, flat foot. He also goes on to explain how each of these foot types require different features in shoes, how these differing foot types can cause foot problems later in life, and when these foot types with their associated problems may require a podiatrist (like me) to evaluate and treat one of these problems, possibly with orthotics. He does a pretty good job of explaining the basics regarding what orthotics are and why some of these foot types would require orthotics. He then goes on to evaluate some running shoes to see if they are right for your foot type.

Dr. Oz and a member of the audience give a little demonstration on walking barefoot with wet feet to evaluate their footprints to see what type of arch they have. He also gives a demonstration of running in the Vibram Five Fingers and explaining why the barefoot runners run the way they do.

For such a short little video segment, he did a great job of explaining the basics and getting people thinking of their feet and their shoes. Two thumbs up, Dr. Oz! 🙂

Dedicated to your foot health and to your shoes,

Dr. Michele, The Shoe Expert

“All Shoes, All the Time!”

 

A Podiatrist’s “Athletic Shoe Guidelines”

Posted in Athletic Shoes, Exercising, Health & Wellness, Physical Fitness, Shoes with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 7, 2011 by The Shoe Expert

My Favorite Running Shoes: Asics

Athletic footwear should be fitted to hold the foot in the position that’s most natural to the movement involved. Athletic shoes protect your feet from stresses encountered in a given sport and to give the player more traction. The differences in design and variations in material, weight, lacing characteristics, and other factors among athletic shoes are meant to protect the areas of the feet that encounter the most stress.

Well-fitted athletic shoes need to be comfortable, yet well-constructed and appropriate for a given activity. A good fit will mitigate blisters and other skin irritations.

Sports-specific athletic shoes are a good investment for serious athletes, though perhaps a less critical consideration for non-athletes. Don’t wear any sport or other shoes beyond their useful life.

A running shoe is built to take impact, while a tennis shoe is made to give relatively more support, and permit sudden stops and turns. Cross training shoes are fine for a general athletic shoe, such as for physical education classes or health club exercising, such as on stair machines and weight-lifting because they provide more lateral support and less flexibility than running shoes. They also tend to be heavier than running shoes, but most people don’t need light, flexible shoes for cross-training. If a child is involved more heavily in any single sport, he or she should wear shoes specifically designed for that sport.

Our practice recommends sturdy, properly fitted athletic shoes of proper width with leather or canvas uppers, soles that are flexible (but only at the ball of the foot), cushioning, arch supports, and room for your toes. Try a well-cushioned sock for reinforcement, preferably one with acrylic fiber content so that some perspiration moisture is “wicked” away.

Athletic shoes need to be replaced after one year, whether or not they are worn, and after a certain amount of repetitive load is placed on them and wears them down. The American Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine advises replacing running or walking shoes after 300 to 500 miles of wear, and replacing aerobic, basketball, and tennis shoes after 45 to 60 hours of wear. Athletic shoes should also be replaced if they show signs of unevenness when placed on a flat surface, display noticeable creasing, and/or when the heel counter breaks down.

(The above is an excerpt from my website www.elmontefootdoctor.com )

Dedicated to your foot health and to your shoes,

Dr. Michele, The Shoe Expert

“All Shoes, All the Time!”
Related Articles

%d bloggers like this: